Upcoming Events
Oct
30
Sun
all-day Cogenhoe Swap Meet & AGM Cogenho... @ Cogehoe & Whiston Village Hall
Cogenhoe Swap Meet & AGM Cogenho... @ Cogehoe & Whiston Village Hall
Oct 30 all-day
Swap Meet bring and buy Triple parts followed by AGM 8:30 AM Swap Meet doors open 12:00 PM Lunch 13:00 PM Onwards TR3OC AGM Members only
Mar
24
Fri
all-day MAD MARCH RALLY 2023
MAD MARCH RALLY 2023
Mar 24 – Mar 26 all-day
Rates  for 2023 would be £61.50 pp sharing a twin/double and £86.50 for a  single room. Pet supplement of £15 per night applicable for those rooms who bring pets. THIS IS FOR DINNER BED AND[...]
Jun
30
Fri
all-day North Wales Camping Weekend @ Station Campsite
North Wales Camping Weekend @ Station Campsite
Jun 30 – Jul 2 all-day
Station Campsite tel: 01490 430237 4th North Wales Rally 30th June – 2nd July Station Campsite, Carrog LL21 9BD. Great Triples, great roads, great people. 100 mile ride out on Saturday. Bbq and live entertainment[...]
Facebook
"

Plymouth. Celebrating the 120th anniversary of Triumph 1902-2022.

Home Forums Event and Ride-out Chatter Plymouth. Celebrating the 120th anniversary of Triumph 1902-2022.

This topic contains 35 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  John Young 1 month ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #14808
    Les Davies
    Les Davies
    Keymaster

    Plymouth.

    Celebrating the 120th anniversary of Triumph 1902 – 2022. 

    As part of this national program, the Triumph dealer at Plympton is organising a local event day to be held on Saturday 27 August ‘22 and is based at their Langage site:

    Triumph Plymouth

    Eagle Road

    Langage Business Park

    Plympton, Plymouth, PL7 5JY

    01752 332795

    A comprehensive range of historic and heritage Triumph machines will be on display. 

    TOMCC Plymouth Branch have kindly been invited to contribute to this event and will have a stand during the day.

    We have secured the services of long time T150 touring guru John Young, who has kindly agreed to attend from his home in the Midlands.

    For those of you who attended our TOMCC Branch anniversary 50 meet on May 11, 2019, at GT Motorcycles, John presented a talk on Daytona 8 – a Rob North Highboy Formula 750 race bike. Afterwards he ran the bike. 

    John has acquired a long and unique experience and interest in the BSA-Triumph triples and provides a rare opportunity for revisiting the fascinating story of the racing Triples of the early ’70s. 

    At the 120 Anniversary event John will be presenting another talk on the classic Triples. His Daytona 8 and Son of Sam T160 Production Racer will also be at the event for close ‘inspection’ and run-up after the talk.

    This is a onetime opportunity for those with an interest in the history of Triumph Motorcycles.

    Actual times of the talk will be published closer to the event.

    It would be great if owners of classic Triples can attend again as at GT in 2019.

    Regards

    TOMCC Plymouth Branch

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
  • #14905
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Participant

    Hi Les,

    I intend to come down from Cardiff for this – I enjoy a decently long day ride.

    Does anybody wish to join me en route? I’ll be riding via M4, M5, Devon Expressway, arriving Lee Mill for the ride out at 11:00 hrs.

    Les – see you there (hopefully)…

    • #14910

      John Young
      Participant

      Ian – please do come and say hello on Saturday

      • #14916
        Ian Weslake-Hill
        Ian Weslake-Hill
        Participant

        John – I hope to do so. I don’t make a habit of travelling long distances to meet fellow enthusiasts just to stand alone in a corner as a moody bugger glowering at others!

        I’ll be the old rocker with his T160 still in his 1970s biking gear. (I never moved on…) Will you be at Lee Mill for the ride in?

      • #14974
        Ian Weslake-Hill
        Ian Weslake-Hill
        Participant

        Hi again, John.

        Good to meet you at the Plymouth Triumph 120 shindig and thanks for an illuminating talk plus bringing The Triple Dynamic Duo! Here’s a photo of you holding forth – I’ll post other photos from that day… …eventually…

        Attachments:
        You must be logged in to view attached files.
  • #14906

    James Herbert
    Participant

    In 1967 I had never sat on a Triumph but I was a Motorcyclist and learning fast. I wAs a civilian student in HMS Thunderer, many old tatty bikes. We all learned a great deal about mending them but the shocking eye-opener was how good the AMC two stroke was at troublefree travel. A bit later I tried a Triumph 500 and it too was better than the so called enthusiasts for exotica would allow. They never crossed Dartmoor let alone ran up to Bath in the day as I did. But the killer was Honda Twin, brakes and rpm, no drama. Our factories were terrible. Everyone wanted a BMC Minivan far cheaper than a bike.

    Now I languish in hospital. Thinking of what decent bike I will buy once mended, won’t be Triumph. But I am pleased to read of riding from Cardiff, not of bikes brought by van.

    Old bike people have devised a strange artificial world in which reality is suppressed. It was not till I owned my Guzzis that I felt bikes did me much good. Too flimsy in design. Amazing the public would buy them new.

    • #14908
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      The story of the British motorbike industry is much revisited, well known and depressing. I had an early (before they became popular/fashionable) Ducati and that was similar – fun to ride but not fun to own! I’d try having rose-tinted specs to look back fondly, but they probably wouldn’t function if made in the UK.

      I lusted after the T160 Trident in the 70s on looks and race victories, not private owners’, critics or the press opinions and experience. So, yes… …I admit it – my reality is suppressed and I’ll defend the bike and its designers’ reps. But I know it is and I live my life accordingly.

      I know Bath well. There are some great engine and brake testing gradients there! And I have a soft spot for Guzzis – if I want a second classic later, it would probably be a late model Le Mans Mk3 for practicality sake. (Although the Duke MHR still pulls at my heart strings…)

      So, if you don’t mind my intrusion, James, are you languishing in hospital due to a bike-related or domestic incident or has an age-related issue crept up on you? (You don’t need to answer that on this forum!)

    • #14992

      John Young
      Participant

      Ian – Good to meet you too

  • #14913

    James Herbert
    Participant

    Completely out of the blue my kidneys went on strike, they are essential, I kept fainting and falling. Not cancer, not yet solved the why. But I will alter my life a bit, less nostalgia, more modern riding, I may buy a V11 Guzzi.

    • #14917
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      Yikes! Sorry to hear that, James! The nearest I got to that in order to express any empathy was a kidney stone years ago that was dumbbell shaped, so it migrated down the pipes, got stuck and gave me eight bouts of urinary tract infections. I kept passing out too, but in a controlled manner that prevented me falling.

      Hope investigations are fruitful and, of course, the issue is treatable!

  • #14915

    James Herbert
    Participant

    Going back to when Tridents were new they were very unusual. I was given a go on a t160 and it was a strikingly good ride. He expanded it via Hyde kit and nothing could touch it. Very exciting on wet road. The Kawasaki z1 was the only other brute. Nobody could afford an Italian of which 3 were interesting. BMW stood alone.

    I also rode a Yamaha 350LC, now that was fun, not heavy expensive. More what was wanted.

    Taken all round my Honda 325 of 1972 is a very fine bike.

    • #14918
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      That Hyde kit was advertised with the line “makes a Z1 look like an aged tortoise” (Bike magazine). Yep – the early to mid-70s was an interesting period of ‘arms race’.

      The three interesting Italian bikes – may I hazard a guess that they were the MV Agusta, the Jota and the Duke GT750?

      I never got to own an LC Yam. I had the earlier RD250DX and that (after I gas-flowed the ports) could hold its own on the motorway. And, returning to an earlier chat about mpg(!), could return 60mpg when dawdling at c.50mph.

      Yes, I grudgingly concur that the 70s Hondas were indeed fine bikes. My late colleague from the 1980s (when I was officially a Cumbrian) had owned a wide range of bikes, including a Vincent, and always said his C90 was the best of the lot.

  • #14928

    James Herbert
    Participant

    Life was fun in 1982 also: 17 yr old came to work on KH250, 3 cylinders 17mpg… L plates. Then he drove County towing brakeless 40 ft trailer, say 20 tons total for which held licence aged 16. He was very good with that outfit but not considered fit on a bike. Civil servants and politicians not a clue. The Elsie was a treat in comparison. Then my brother decided to buy 175 Honda but not considered safe to ride it. But boy of 19 kills several with HGV for which he has ticket but no feel.

    • #14930
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      Sadly, the vehicle licensing laws are a hangover from the agriculture industry, when young farmworkers were expected to drive and haul the big stuff. The firearm and shotgun laws are similar.

      Out of sight is out of mind. Unlike motorbikes…

  • #14932

    James Herbert
    Participant

    Going back to 1970s I only once saw an MV, knew the odd Ducati and Laverda. But gradually came to realise Guzzi was far tougher. I have worn out 6 tyres for zero replaced mechanism or electrics. I bought a plate carrying the filter externally to make changes quick easy. It is evil if ridden hard away uphill in 1st when you go for 2nd but otherwise faultless. The T3 is ordinary, 1000s has 40mm carburettors and goes very high rpm, makes main road traffic disappear, but not quite equal Honda VFR but far more animal. Half price of Commando, unbreakable.

  • #14934
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Participant

    I applaud your dedication to one of the world’s oldest motorcycle marques. They ought to know a thing or two by now! After all, Ducati was an electronics company before Allied bombing made them start all over again, Laverda only built small commuter bikes until some Brits suggested otherwise, Kawasaki are ship builders, etc…

    I’m intrigued by your stating that yours is “…evil if ridden hard away uphill in 1st…”. Torque reaction to blame…?

  • #14936

    James Herbert
    Participant

    No, the gap from 1st to 2nd is wide and primary reduction is 1.235 so like a vintage car it needs a double de clutch on shut throttle but we have indexing lever and no means to slow the engine shaft. The upper ratios are close enough for a quick click. BMW is worse as no primary reduction. The traditional big reduction primary means most bike gears carry small rotating inertia and change ratio sweetly.

  • #14937

    James Herbert
    Participant

    It is best ridden gently into 2nd early on at low rpm. Gives most bikes a good run at speed.

    • #14939
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      Noted. That makes perfect sense.

      I’ve driven vintage buses. Now THAT takes some serious double de-clutching…!

  • #14938

    James Herbert
    Participant

    I have been provoked, noticed daylight beneath front wheel as I levelled with something reptilian from traffic lights, tough brute!

    • #14940
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      Something reptilian? LOL. Do tell…!

  • #14941

    James Herbert
    Participant

    It is interesting how few people, who think they are motor enthusiasts can drive. On a farm a student came for harvest, set to move large dung spreader behind ordinary crash box tractor. Not a clue. We used 5 speed Nuffield, 3 X 2 Ford, 8 Deere. With Ford and road trailer you needed high top, then low, but then middle high. Quite logically done – up to 6 then down to middle. Silent jerkfree. But woe if you got both neutrals at once, and don’t expect brakes to save you.

    The Deere had 2 speed synchromesh but if you do wanted 8 from 7 it was not easy, 6 went with 8. My biggest was an Atkinson with 12 litre RR and Fuller 10 speed.

    On You Tube is motor journalist with 3 litre Bentley, hilarious, useless. My father had one, left foot well apart from pedals, he could silently select any from any. I used to scare passengers in a Spridget by selecting 1st at 25mph, they expected the box to burst.

    • #14949
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      Agreed. A little mechanical empathy and awareness of what’s happening out of sight helps enormously!

      My favourite was the Wilson preselect box. Drove a few of those, being a Daimler & Lanchester Owners’ Club member, from a BSA car through Daimler 15s and up to a CVD6 bus. Lovely…

  • #14942

    James Herbert
    Participant

    5 speed Trident box gives good clutchless changes from sensitive toe and eased throttle. Velo better into top and 1st than middle pair because middle spider delicate. Big dogs and some slop helps. When cold wet it is nice to ride with minimum of flurry, top mark to Quaife style dog box.

    • #14950
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      I agree re Trident 5-speed. When my left big toe got bruised, I rode by reaching down and did hand changes…!

  • #14959
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Participant

    First photo from yesterday ‘s shindig – Mr John Young waxing lyrical about the 1976 Son of Sam (alongside) and the 1971 Daytona 8 triple.

    And you were expecting lots of bike photos! (Don’t worry – there were c.120 of us on the ride in and more waiting at the venue so more photos to come of the gathering…)

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
  • #14961

    James Herbert
    Participant

    Two things re Wilson box, I couldn’t get a Lanchester to climb a mound from standstill because fluid flywheel just held engine below needed torque. Also be careful with starting handle… Riley thought running over me would teach me lesson! It had very low 1st and centrifugal clutch. The clutches have bad features: aluminium cage thermal expansion to early slip or cracks to  bursting. Books tell not to dismantle box, but I did and afterwards had reverse which had lost its linings. Very impressed by Riley 12/4 but about Mini 850 performance. Proper engineering except end thrust in oil pump.

  • #14972
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Participant

    You have me at a disadvantage – I’ve never had to work on said boxes but simply enjoyed the normal driving of others’ vehicles with fluid flywheels. (Abnormal driving would arise from ownership or trade activities!) I’m guessing that the Lanchester you mention was an LD10…?

     

  • #14976

    James Herbert
    Participant

    I think it more probably 14, circa 1950, like a 4 cylinder Conquest (Century) Daimler.

    I also drove a jerkomatic Ford 3000, that had 13 speeds on single quadrant. Divided as 3 for road,. 10 for field. Many tractors have epicyclic boxes and change on the go, was a way of having 12 ratios on old 3 speed crash box, 4 epicyclic added.

    • #14977
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      If it looked like a Conquest saloon, it may well have been a Leda – the last of the Lanchesters. I consider myself fortunate to have known the late widow of George L – one memorable lunchtime at the factory imbibing in whisk(e)y (ie. scotch AND Irish,) springs to mind…

  • #14978

    James Herbert
    Participant

    A real Lanchester, product of Frederick was/is a wonderful thing. I am less sold on the BSAs.

    My great great uncle had one when Surrey numbers were preceded by single letter P. He bought it, made a horseless carriage house with chauffeur flat, for his wife to use but she died. The car was still there when my father began motorcycling/motoring. My great aunt had a 10 but I think it a BSA.

    Reverting to 1904, GK Churchward had cars demonstrated S of Swindon, much grumbling “That is not a hill it is a ruddy mountain.” He bought the Lanchester, as also Kipling, people had good advice but the majority didn’t think.

    • #14979
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      Yes, Lanchester cars are much lamented by those who remember them. The first internal combustion British automobile (the actual first British automobile being Trevithick’s 1801 car), the first disc brakes also appeared first on a Lanchester.

      Fascinating family history, JH. I know what you mean, regarding the hills south of Swindon – I cycled there some years ago to meet up with a certain Dr Alex Moulton…

      I’ll counter your Kipling with a Simon & Garfunkel lyric – “But a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest” (‘The Boxer’, track 1 on side 2 of Bridge over Troubled Water).

  • #14982

    James Herbert
    Participant

    My maternal grandfather worked for a bicycle factory, was out on road when a motorcar came along, he knew what it was but jumped in the ditch till it had passed, he giggled aged about 75 when he told me. No more pedalling, he moved to workshop of hotel which ran a few Panhard & Levassor s. One morning in 1903 told to put down file, go out with George and learn driving as more P&Ls hired out than drivers. So PSV in a couple of hours, but the law only required ‘A competent man’. He made passengers walk downhill as brakes nbg. No fuss, horse had no brake either. He told me the best bikes had Vtwin of 8hp. I think he would approve my Guzzi.

    • #14984
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Ian Weslake-Hill
      Participant

      Ah, the good old days. My father was a committed motorcyclist – he had a BSA Empire Star back when he was single and fancy free in the 1930s. Then, after the war, marriage forced him onto a pedal bike until the 1960s when he bought a 100E Ford Pop.

      I think my dad would have approved of my T160, if only for the electric start!

  • #14988

    James Herbert
    Participant

    I saw an Empire Star tolerating Saturday traffic recently.   Father had a Blue Star 350 which went well enough, but he was taken aback by its thirst when asked to carry pillion 100 miles during petrol rationing.   It also seized one Monday morning similar trip, ok after cooled a bit, but I often doubt cast iron and continuous hard work, with massive bits of fin carved away for pushrods.

  • #14989
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Ian Weslake-Hill
    Participant

    Empire Star is a good bike – it morphed into the Goldie after Brooklands performance.

    I doubt ANY 350cc or under will perform well two-up, particularly on mpg! And CI is OK if one doesn’t expect too much of heat rejection capability, i.e. plugger bikes not racy bikes.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.