Upcoming Events

Jan
6
Sat
9:00 am Newark – CAROLE NASH CLASSIC BIK... @ Newark Showground
Newark – CAROLE NASH CLASSIC BIK... @ Newark Showground
Jan 6 @ 9:00 am – Jan 7 @ 5:00 pm
A kick-start to the new classic motorcycling year, the Carole Nash Classic Bike Guide Winter Classic returns to offer enthusiasts a chance to stock up ahead of a new riding season. Hundreds of trade stands[...]
Feb
3
Sat
10:00 am 38th Carole Nash Bristol Classic... @ Bath &West Showground
38th Carole Nash Bristol Classic... @ Bath &West Showground
Feb 3 @ 10:00 am – Feb 4 @ 5:00 pm
The Royal Bath & West in Shepton Mallet, Somerset, is the venue for the traditional Carole Nash Bristol Classic MotorCycle Show – an event that many deem as their favourite of the year. With a friendly atmosphere,[...]
Feb
25
Sun
9:00 am Cogenhoe Swap Meet @ Cogenhoe Village Hall
Cogenhoe Swap Meet @ Cogenhoe Village Hall
Feb 25 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
The annual TR3OC swap meet where you can buy and sell triple parts.

Facebook

"

The Bikes

The Beginning

Doug Hele and Bert Hopwood had discussed the concept of a three cylinder engine for about two years before the first sketches were drawn in 1963.  The whole point of their thinking was to achieve a level of smooth running not possible with a large capacity twin, whilst retaining the high-speed handling that is compromised by adopting a four cylinder transverse engine.  In 1963, the project was low priority and without backing from the Triumph Managing Director, Edward Turner.  Despite this, the first 750cc three-cylinder prototype was built in the Meriden Experimental Department in 1964.  It was code named P1.

P1

The P1 Prototype, owned by the TR3OC

P1 was rebuilt by the TR3OC in 1997 and now resides in the London Motorcycle Museum.  There is a must-read series of articles on this re-build in the Triple Tales Continued section.

Initial testing of P1 was very promising but there were many issues to overcome e.g. overheating, wet sumping, noisy primary drive (using pinions) etc.  Further development to improve matters resulted in the building of P2 in 1966.  The retirement of Edward Turner and other management changes, plus news from Japan that a four-cylinder 750cc bike was planned, gave the project higher importance and it was decided to continue through to production.

Ogle Design were appointed to style the new machine and presented their designs in 1967.  They received very mixed reviews from design staff, management and the vitally important US distributors.  But the radical new look won through and the BSA Rocket 3 and the Triumph Trident were launched to the world in September 1968.  The era of the Superbike had begun!

Over 33,000 machines were produced until production ceased in 1976.

Model Summary

Click on any bike for more details

 

BSA Rocket Three

Year 1968-72

Production numbers 5,897

Triumph Trident T150

Year 1968-74

Production numbers 19,179

1969-bsa-rocket3 Triumph Trident T150 750 68

 

Triumph Trident T160

Year 1975-77

Production numbers 7,104

Triumph X75 Hurricane

Year 1973

Production numbers 1,048

75T160US X75 Hurricane

 

Racing Triples Specials
alex george silverstone 1 (2) Harrier